Support Tavis Smiley & PBS Against Zionist Attacks

I sent the following comment to the PBS Ombudsman Michael Getler. I encourage you to submit a comment supporting Tavis Smiley and PBS.

I only learned about the February 2, 2017 interview with Miko Peled on Tavis Smiley’s show this morning. I watched the episode. What Mr. Peled said is only shocking and extreme because many media outlets never allow critiques of Zionism. The tag “Israeli-Palestinian Conflict” at FAIR Media Watch is endless, yet worth reading.

I appreciated your response to the criticism of Mr. Smiley. I guess I just wanted to let you know that at least this viewer thought the segment was excellent.

 

Finally, it’s worth noting that the United States Department of State definition of anti-Semitism which CAMERA uses is designed to suppress criticism of Zionism and Israel. South Carolina is now attempting to force universities to apply it to on-campus activities. The inevitable result will be suppression of speech critical of Zionism and Israel. Continue reading

Columbia County (Georgia) Commission Chairman Ron Cross Misunderstands Transgender Rights as “Political Correctness”

In the November 2016 Columbia County (Georgia) Newsletter, Commission Chairman Ron Cross writes in his list of “Downers”:

Political Correctness:
Can you believe that we have reached a point where we must have direction on which restroom to use? It seems to me it is very simple: you go to the restroom that matches the equipment that God gave you. Regardless of how I may feel, nature has already made a determination.

Oh well, this is a problem for people much younger than me to wage.

Continue reading

The United States is Becoming Like Egypt

Updated January 16, 2017. Colby Cooper removed his posts on Twitter & Facebook related to this incident. I’ve substituted the links to them with screenshots I took.

Two stories demonstrate how the United States is becoming Egypt. Both are associated with Trump, but it would be a mistake to believe that the roots of this transformation did not begin before him. If you’re studying for the SAT, you can use these to help you learn the meanings of obsequious and impunity. Continue reading

State of Georgia in 1939: African-American recreation facilities only needed to include “simple local developments”

Throughout the [Georgia] State Planning Board’s Report on Outdoor Recreation in Georgia (1939), the writers advocated for segregated recreational facilities based on racial and socioeconomic categories. … For white “land owners,” prime destinations apparently included coastal and mountain destinations “during the warm summer months” and “especially when crop prospects” were favorable. But for “the white tenant class of the farming population,” the report observed, “recreation among the men and boys” consisted primarily “of hunting and fishing” and sports. Additionally, these white tenant families–perhaps white wives and girls more specifically–enjoyed “old fashioned church sociables [sic] … and special events” such as barbecues. Finally the authors assessed African Americans, who were not subcategorized as property owners or tenants or by their sex. The authors’ racial stereotypes assumed that African Americans’ recreation was “peculiar to their racial characteristics” and only “centered around churches.” As such, African American recreation facilities only needed to include “simple local developments, such as playfields with barbecue grounds and swimming pools.” African Americans, so the thinking went, would not like the beach or mountains, and these prescriptions ultimately limited African American exposure to particular types of outdoor recreation and environments.

From pp. 103-4, Southern Water, Southern Power: How the Politics of Cheap Energy and Water Scarcity Shaped a Region by Christopher J. Manganiello.

Segregationists Opposed Federal Government Multi-Use Water Projects in the South

[McCormick, SC attorney] Frank Harrison was among a small group of regular writers to South Carolina’s congressional delegation who linked the Savannah River’s water and energy history to the nation’s civil rights conflict and postwar rights-based liberalism beginning in the 1950s. … “The taking of huge areas of private property by the Federal Government is becoming increasingly dangerous especially in view of  the recent [Brown v Board of Education] Supreme Court decision and other actions of the administration in attempting to continue the centralizing power of the Federal Government.” “The widespread increase of federal public use and recreation areas may result in serious political repercussions in this state and other states because these areas may become areas which cannot be used to any extent by members of the white race.” … The conservative letter writers who shared their ideas about Trotters Shoals and environmental politics identified entitlements–to local self-determination, to peaceful segregated recreation, or access to the water supply–as fundamental rights. [pp 158-60]

From Southern Water, Southern Power: How the Politics of Cheap Energy and Water Scarcity Shaped a Region by Christopher J. Manganiello.