Belief in the Domino Theory Inadequate to Explain USA Military Intervention in SE Asia #VietnamWarPBS

I’ve written a few entries on Ken Burns’s Public Broadcasting Service series The Vietnam War. In this podcast, Gareth Porter discussed some aspects of the United States’s military intervention which the series did not address well. In particular, the USA military had by 1961 discounted the Domino Theory which was the public basis USA presidents used to convince the public that war was necessary. In addition, USA presidents may be ill-suited to oppose the wishes of a unified pro-war cabinet, military chiefs-of-staff and directors of intelligence agencies. So have a listen.

Gareth Porter wrote a book published in 2006 entitled Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam.

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Domestic Opposition to USA Wars Was Not Unique to Vietnam, Contrary to the Impression #VietnamWarPBS Gives

9781440845185I know I supposedly summed up my thoughts on Ken Burns’s and Lynn Novick’s The Vietnam War, but I realized I had neglected to lodge one final complaint. While I don’t remember if the narrator (whom I took to be the voice of Burns & Novick) makes this claim, many interviewees act as if United States citizens had never opposed their government’s wars until Vietnam. The problem with this is that, in our moment of cultural backlash against the 1960s and 1970s, people may attribute opposition to today’s wars to be rooted in cultural developments of the 1960s and 1970s and hence dismiss it.

I’ve written several blog entries about the Burns & Novick PBS documentary The Vietnam War. I’ve also tweeted about it.

Cigarettes Are Best Image of End of USA Trade Embargo with Vietnam

At minute 95:37 of Episode 10 of the PBS Vietnam War series, I captured this screenshot:

USA cigarettes E10-9537

The preceding narration was:

In 1994, after the Vietnamese met the Americans’ demand, the United States lifted its trade embargo. Full normalization came the following year.

I hope the Vietnamese got something more than USA cancer sticks.

I’ve written several blog entries about the Burns & Novick PBS documentary The Vietnam War. I’ve also tweeted about it.

Final Thoughts on @KenBurns #VietnamWarPBS: Will We Wait 40 Years for #AfghanistanWarPBS?

I’ve blogged after watching Episode 1 and Episode 4 of Ken Burns‘s PBS documentary The Vietnam War. I’ve finished watching all 10 episodes, and I thought I’d share some general thoughts on the documentary.

  1. It’s technically extremely well-done and will please any fan of historical documentaries.
  2. Even when interviewees said things with which I disagreed, I felt I could respect or at least acknowledge their perspective. The exception to this is of course war criminal John Negroponte. Like other Burns documentaries, you are moved towards reconciliation.
  3. And of course Burns’s skill at #1 & #2 is the deadly flaw of this documentary: After 10 episodes, the documentary doesn’t editorially tell you how to react to contemporary USA wars. Like President Obama’s speeches, it gives viewers material with which they can arrive at conclusions suited to the preconceptions with which they began the film, although mellowed towards those who draw an opposite conclusion.

Continue reading

Moments from Burns’s Vietnam Episode 4 – Image, Sound and Narration Conflict

After watching the first episode, I wrote about my fears that the series would whitewash USA militarism. Here are some observations after watching Episode 4, “Resolve.”

Minute 34:

Narrator: Mogie’s combat commander, Lieutenant Colonel Henry Emerson, known as “the Gunfighter,” was courageous, implacable, relentless. A few months before Mogie got there, he had offered a case of whiskey to the first of his men to bring him the hacked-off head of an enemy soldier. They did. [Emphasis added. Dennis Crocker was nicknamed Mogie.] Continue reading

Your Local Sierra Club is a Great Way to Experience Hiking

If you are looking to get in shape or just escape your connected world for a few hours, hiking is a wonderful alternative. I wanted to do hikes, but I did not want to go into the woods on my own. I was worried that I’d get lost, I’d get tired, etc. These are valid fears! But your local Sierra Club (find one near to you here) likely has excursions with excursion leaders who will help you enjoy the outing and return home safely. Getting outdoors is part of the Sierra Club Mission Statement! The idea is that, if people knew the value of wilderness, they’re more likely to protect it.

With advice and assistance from my local Sierra Club members, I did reach a level where I felt comfortable doing 5-6 mile well-marked trails alone. Today, we did an 8-mile hike on the Keg Creek section of Bartram Trail. I had not been hiking and exercising lately, so I needed that safety net. Here’s a picture when we were about 2.5 miles into the trail. We’re all still smiling. I’m the obese guy on the left. No pictures at the end. I was warmed over death at that point.

Photo Oct 07, 10 12 35 AM