Do Local Police Do Counter-Terrorism Because of Federal Money and Asset Forfeitures?

Local police devote resources based on threat to public safety, correct? Check out Georgia police agencies lose millions in Congress budget move by Willoughby Mariano in the Atlanta Journal Constitution of February 14, 2016.

Georgia law enforcement agencies and others across the country may drop out of anti-drug and terrorism task forces and are scaling back spending after Congress raided a stash of federal funds that has given this state more than $200 million in recent years. Read more

What White America Can Learn from Nationwide’s #MakeSafeHappen Messages

Just to start off, all of us can learn from this campaign. I’m not sure if the Super Bowl advertisement was great marketing, but the tips on the web site are informative and you should implement them. Thank you, Nationwide. Continue reading

Street Artist Behind Satirical NYPD “Drone” Posters Arrested

anarcho-queer:

Street Artist Behind Satirical NYPD “Drone” Posters Arrested

A street artist who hung satirical posters criticising police surveillance activities has been arrested after an NYPD investigation tracked him to his doorstep. With the help of a small crew, the artist now identified as Essam Attia had placed the fake Big Brother-style adverts in locations throughout Manhattan, using a fake Van Wagner maintenance van and uniforms to avoid detection.

In a video interview with Animal New York prior to his arrest, a voice-scrambled and silhouetted Attia explained that he placed the provocative ads to “create a conversation” about disturbing trends in police surveillance, alluding to recent efforts by the Department of Homeland Security to “facilitate and accelerate the adoption” of unmanned aerial drones by local police departments. The posters also followed recent expansions in NYPD surveillance powers which allow officers to monitor citizens by creating fake identities on social networking sites.

The NYPD’s response seems to have proven Attia’s point: months after forensics teams and a “counter-terrorism” unit was spotted on the scene, the NYPD last Wednesday successfully tracked down and arrested the 29-year-old art school vandal, who identified himself in the video as a former “geo-spatial analyst” serving US military operations in Iraq.

It’s not the first time the NYPD has overreacted to unsanctioned public art. Earlier this year, the department arrested 50-year-old Takeshi Miyakawa after he illuminated the streets of Williamsburg, Brooklyn with harmless LED lanterns made from plastic “I Heart NY” shopping bags. The crackdown in Attia’s case, however, seems to have more to do with the public embarrassment faced by the department as a result of the mock ads.

Attia now faces 56 counts of criminal possession of a forged instrument and grand larceny possession of stolen property for his spree last September, with an additional charge of weapons possession after officers allegedly found an unloaded .22 caliber revolver under his bed during the raid. As for the drones themselves, the NYPD has still not revealed any plans to use aerial robotic enforcers. But if the expanding list of FAA authorizations and documented use of drones by local police in Texas and Miami, Floridaare any indication, it may be only a matter of time.

US Dept of Homeland #Security @DHSJournal “If You See Something, Say Something” #GWOT #Counterterrorism #CivilRights #Discrimination #Profiling

My first instinct when I came across this video was to dismiss it and come up with alternate titles such as, “If you see someone brown, say something.” “If you hear something non-Anglo, say something.” But as I’m trying to become a more responsible person each day, and, above all else, terrorist attacks are wrong and we should do what makes sense to prevent them, I watched the video and wrote a few comments.

1. The video takes care not to portray Muslims as the only terrorists, which is good.

2. For some reason, the terrorists nearly all wear black and have hoodies.

3. At minute 2:44-2:50, surveillance and elicitation are mentioned as possible suspicious behavior. At 7:54, a man in a hoodie taking notes and pictures at the train is portrayed as suspicious. How can a person pursue a public issue without these activities? For example, Justice Clarence Thomas is supposed to come to my city of Augusta, GA to inaugurate a new federal courthouse. The date was unknown, and I was thinking of planning a demonstration. I called people in the city government to find out when the opening ceremony was to take place. Is that elicitation going to put me on some list? (I know I’m already on lists, so it does not bother me.) But will a white person with an Anglo name end up on a list because of elicitation or surveillance or note taking?

4. OK, so let’s assume all us non-white, non-Anglos take one for the team and not care about extra surveillance on us and our being investigated for normal activities. Will authorities, after investigation, inform us that we were investigated and cleared? Is there a process for removing records related to the incident from all the databases? Will these reports affect security clearances and other professional opportunities?

5. Will there be an effort by the authorities to educate our Anglo brothers and sisters who submit the crazy reports so that their paranoid fears of the non-Anglo may diminish?

Addendum:

In the time it took me to write this, CAIR reported two cases of police and private security freaking out over Muslims. One involved an airline passenger in San Diego, and the other a college student in Virginia.

Sept 8, 2011 Addendum: Under Suspicion at the Mall of America

April 29, 2012 Addendum: Charges against Virginia college student dropped