Rejoicing in USA Civil War Led to More Wars

I’ve previously blogged about the dangers of romanticizing the United States Civil War. Sinclair Lewis’s voice in It Can’t Happen Here, Doremus Jessup, in Chapter 13 considers the dangers posed by people who believe they have The Solution and questions the value his 1930s contemporaries place on the Civil War:

Slavery had been a cancer, and in that day was known no remedy save bloody cutting. There had been no X-rays of wisdom and tolerance. Yet to sentimentalize this cutting, to justify and rejoice in it, was an altogether evil thing, a national superstition that was later to lead to other Unavoidable Wars–wars to free Cubans, to free Filipinos who didn’t want our brand of freedom, to End All Wars.

Let us, thought Doremus, not throb again to the bugles of the Civil War, nor find diverting the gallantry of Sherman’s dashing Yankee boys in burning the houses of lone women, nor particularly admire the calmness of General Lee as he watched thousands writhe in the mud.

The Dangers of USA Civil War Nostalgia & Romanticism

On November 5, 2015, author Robert Hicks (Twitter) talked about his book The Widow of the South and the place of the USA Civil War in history at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, Georgia, USA as part of the 5th Civil War Symposium. In my opinion, he oversold the position he took in his New York Times column on the 150th anniversary of the final day of the battle in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. What I heard, which may not be exactly or substantially what Mr. Hicks said, was that the federal government’s victory in the Civil War preserved the United States so it could play a saving role for humanity “twice” in the 20th century C.E. Continue reading

My Young Love

I’ve shut off. I know you think if you break enough dishes and throw enough glasses at me that I’ll listen to you. But I’ve shut off. You know I hate your foul mouth, so you ratchet it up a notch. I wonder how we ever began. I realize I must have some psychosis that attracted you to me. I reach the bedroom and lock the door. I’m glad we have a master bedroom. Now you’ve triggered the fire alarm. This isn’t worth the rest of the lease.

Special Arab/Muslim themed issue of Science Fiction Magazine.

Fiction:
“The Green Book” by Amal El-Mohtar
“50 Fatwas for the Virtuous Vampire” by Pamela K. Taylor
“The Faithful Soldier, Prompted” by Saladin Ahmed
“Kamer-taj, the Moon-horse” from Forty-Four Turkish Fairy Tales

Poetry:
“Me and Rumi’s Ghost” by Samer Rabadi
“Tur Disaala” by Jawad Elhusuni