doctorswithoutborders:

An MSF staff member conducts a training session for Libyan medical personnel in Misrata’s Kararim Advanced Medical Clinic.

MSF teams are currently providing medical assistance in Misrata, Benghazi, Zintan and Yefren. More info here: An Update on MSF Activities Amidst the Ongoing War in Libya

Photo: Libya 2011 © Eddy McCall/MSF

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Rogue State: @WhiteHouse Jokes About Assassinating Foreign Leaders

At the end of the May 2, 2011 White House press briefing, Press Secretary Jay Carney joked about assassinating Libyan President Muammar al-Qaddafi.

Q    Jay, almost lost in this news is the NATO strike against Qaddafi’s compound on Saturday, where his son was killed and three of his grandchildren.  Is it — does the White House believe that that mission was in keeping with carrying out the U.N. resolution?

      MR. CARNEY:  Yes.  And I think there have been ample — there’s been ample commentary about that from NATO.  So we do believe that, and obviously continue to focus on that mission as we do on other missions.

      Q    Is there a message there to Qaddafi in this?

      MR. CARNEY:  You could say that.  (Laughter.)  Thank you.

Mistreating @HRW – @PBS mentions #Libya using #ClusterBombs, ignores #USA #Israel @banclusterbombs

United States Public Broadcasting System’s The News Hour highlights Libya’s use of cluster bombs and fails to mention the United States’s and Israel’s use of cluster bombs.

PBS’s The News Hour’s piece Fighting Continues in Misrata as 3 Countries Send Advisers to Assist Rebels, broadcast April 20, 2011, mentions the Human Rights Watch report on Libya’s use of cluster bombs in Misrata April 14, 2011.

Yet The News Hour fails to mention Human Rights Watch’s reports on the United States’s use of cluster bombs in Afghanistan in 2002 and Iraq in 2003 and its reports on Israel’s use of cluster bombs in Lebanon in 2006.

According to the Cluster Munition Coalition, the United States has not signed nor ratified the Convention on Cluster Munitions has not participated in the Oslo Process meetings.

I condemn the Libyan government’s use of these inhumane weapons, and I’m happy that The News Hour used Human Rights Watch as a source of information. But The News Hour should bring to the attention of its viewers that their own government and its allies use these weapons in addition to today’s villain du jour.

Should Progressives Support the Government of #Libya? #Revolution or #Counterrevolution

A friend raised to me questions about Libya’s revolution. I tried to gather materials which the point of view which defends the Libyan government or criticizes the rebels.

I don’t necessarily subscribe to these views.

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/countries/MENARegion/Pages/LYIndex.aspx

As U.S. warships near Libya, Danger of Imperialist Military Intervention Grows

US, British and French military advisers have arrived in #Cyrenaica, #Libya eastern breakaway province http://bit.ly/e7Kmjn

Libya is not Egypt and all rebellions are not Revolutions! Hands off Libya, Hands off Africa! Statement of All-African People’s Revolutionary Party

Pan-African News Wire

Two-hour discussion on Atlanta’s WRFG, March 7, 2011

Is #Libya Like #Tunisia and #Egypt? #Revolution #Africa #Arab

A friend wrote to me asking for my thoughts on the north African revolutions, particularly Libya.

The world media I have noticed is incredibly biased against all the Middle Eastern and African leaders and there presentation of the events unfolding now is not even close to being neutral.  Ghaddafi is the prime example, we have yet to hear from any of his supporters and when we do hear from Ghaddafi himself the media portrays him as some sort of madman.  Granted he has been the leader of Libya for 42 years and he was at odds with the United States for much of those 42 years.  However, one has to look beneath the surface and question the perspective the media is taking. They tend to focus on his attire and his cadre of female bodyguards, however it is a rare occurrence indeed when the media, including the Arab media, refers to the financial support he has provided to many sub-Saharan African countries.  They prefer to paint him in these broad brush strokes as an unhinged meglomaniac oblivious to the needs of the people.  It seems on the service that the people are protesting in Libya for the same reasons they protested in Egypt, but beneath the surface there most be more because the two countries are very dissimilar.  Libya has oil wealth, Egypt does not, Libya is very sparsely populated, whereas Egypt has a very dense population all concentrated along the banks of the Nile.  Perhaps those who are calling for Ghaddafi’s ouster and merely taking advantage of a situation in order to seize power and when they do, nothing truly will change.  Things may even become worse. What do you think?

My uninformed opinion is that Libya has been ineffective in creating positive change, whether it be domestic or in the rest of the African continent. Having said that, see the article below entitled Libya, Getting it Right. I also remember when I was in Nigeria meeting a South African who told me he was traveling to Libya to present to the Moammar al-Qaddafi a book which praised his government’s achievements.

I believe it is essential to reject all outside military intervention, although there’s really no way to prevent arms from reaching either the government or a rebel faction. In addition, freezing assets is a major intervention which the US had not done in the case of the Tunisian or Egyptian (or Saudi) despots, but it has frozen Libyan assets. So in no case should anybody believe that the U.S. can play a positive role in Libya or elsewhere, other than simply avoiding further intervention.

Tumblrs, do you have anything you’d like to add to this?