The Hypocrisy of USA Immigration Policy

From Farmers brace for workforce shortage under Obama’s executive action on immigration in the Augusta Chronicle of December 28, 2014:

Farmers already scrambling to find workers in California – the nation’s leading grower of fruits, vegetables and nuts – fear an even greater labor shortage under President Obama’s executive action to block about 5 million people from deportation.

Thousands of the state’s farmworkers, who make up a significant portion of those who will benefit, might choose to leave the uncertainty of their seasonal jobs for steady work building homes, cooking in restaurants and cleaning hotel rooms.

This article illustrates the hypocrisy of US immigration policy. Whole industries depend on cheap labor, and we deprive those laborers of a legal status so their employers can exploit them.

Let’s just be honest. If we want cheap fruit & vegetables, $0.50 chicken pieces, clean office buildings, manicured landscaping and construction workers on demand, then we have to have immigrants willing to do these tasks. Now the only question is whether we want them to have enough rights to be able to approach the police when landlords, employers and criminals exploit them.

We have a North American Free Trade Agreement which gives the Jalisco tomato and Iowan wheat more rights to cross borders than Mexicans.

If you believe in free markets for products, shouldn’t you believe in free markets for labor?

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Allen, Barrow Debate Reveals Limitations of Two-Party System

On September 27 in Evans, the Democratic Party and Republic Party nominees for the November 2014 General Election to the position of Representative to the United States Congress of Georgia’s 12th District, John Barrow and Rick Allen, respectively, answered questions posed by moderator Steve Crawford of the Columbia County News Times. They discussed defense spending, government surveillance, resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and other issues. Continue reading

“The Natural is supposed to be a blue-eyed boy who teethed on a 36-ounce Louisville Slugger. He should run like the wind and throw boysenberries through brick. He should come from California.” – Steve Wulf, Sports Illustrated, 1981.
 
So how was it that a pudgy 19-year-old Mexican left-handed pitcher from a remote village in the Sonoran desert, unable to speak a word of English, could sell out stadiums across America and become a rock star overnight?

In Fernando Nation, Mexican-born and Los Angeles-raised director Cruz Angeles traces the history of a community that was torn apart when Dodger Stadium was built in Chavez Ravine and then revitalized by one of the most captivating pitching phenoms baseball has ever seen.

SOLIDARITY wth the CUBAN FIVE! Free them NOW! Dec 3 in Tijuana REGISTER NOW!