Would Mutual Friends Address My Former Friend’s Islamophobic Comment on Facebook?

I moved back to my hometown of Augusta, Georgia 13 years ago after an absence of 18 years, except for visits. Shortly thereafter, I bumped into a person whom I considered a friend from high school. We exchanged pleasantries and became friends on Facebook. At some point, this former friend (“FF”) objected to some of my political posts, and, after some online back-and-forth on these matters, we stopped being friends on Facebook (and I don’t remember who “defriended” whom), although we do have mutual friends there. We haven’t, to my knowledge, met again IRL. Continue reading

Report on Your Neighbors; Don’t Worry About How Info is Used

Don't Worry How Info is Used

The Augusta Chronicle on January 2, 2016 published a column by Georgia Emergency Management Agency Director Jim Butterworth. It included this assurance not to concern yourself with the impact your report on your neighbors might have. He concluded this column by encouraging us not to be “un-American” by failing to report something that “might be out of the ordinary.”

The bottom line is that we cannot let those who may have ill intent succeed in their desire to adversely affect our way of life. To let that happen would be un-American.

AS WE CONTINUE into the new year, make it part of your daily routine to be vigilant and engaged in your surroundings. If you notice something that might be out of the ordinary – something that you just want to let someone else know about – please don’t hesitate.

The Poor Case for Torture

Augusta, GA columnist Austin Rhodes reiterated his support for torture by publishing his thoughts from six years ago.

I’m going to try to address the column point by point, but I think that many of these points are not the real reasons we should oppose torture. Continue reading

“Terrorist” Tells You More About the State Classifying the Crime than the Crime Itself

“If it’s an al-Qaeda attack, you can bet it will affect the resources and how we respond to it,” [Daniel L.] Byman said. But “many of the objectives [of right-wing extremist groups] are close enough to legitimate political movements. It would be hard to take them on as a whole without causing a lot of discomfort” among people who don’t have violent aims.

This basically sums up why only Muslims, black separatists, defenders of the planet’s ecology and animal rights activists are treated as terrorists, with all the legal disabilities that entails, while white people who talk, meet, train and eventually kill people are never treated as terrorists. If the ideology which motivates you to violence meets the USA oligarchy’s approval, you can’t be a terrorist, no matter what you do.