We’re finally safe at last! #USA #GWOT #Empire #Budget

Would non-Muslims stop misusing the term jihad to attack their political enemies?

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Props to Haroon Moghul for Jihad Chai Latte, an article he wrote in response to The New York Times columnist Joe Norcera’s misuse of the term jihad in an attack on the United States Tea Party.

I had seen on Twitter the term teahadist, and there’s even a Twitter account by that name.

Whatever the merits of the criticism of the Tea Party, it’s a misuse of the Muslim religious term jihad and contributes to Islamophobia. Many Muslims suggest using the Muslim religious term hiraba for terrorist violence. Tearabist, people!

Jihad is a meritorious act in Islam. Before you set the FBI on me, understand that to me, and to most Muslims, jihad is effort expended for a good cause. When it involves military action, it is subject to the conditions similar to Christians’ Just War doctrines.*

Think about the English term crusades. A Twitter search of the term reveals its use as defined at dictionary.com.

any vigorous, aggressive movement for the defense or advancement of an idea, cause, etc.: a crusade against child abuse.

So why are liberal commentators using jihad pejoratively when there is an authentic Muslim term to describe terroristic violence pejoratively and an authentic English word that can carry both positive and negative connotations?

In May 2014, a glaring example of liberal Islamophobia was published by Tennesseans for Preservation of Personal Privacy in the Tennessee Times Free Press. Read more.

Retired Major General Perry Smith, a local columnist at The Augusta Chronicle, wrote regarding the Arab revolutionaries:

These moderate leaders are sometimes called the Arab revolutionaries counter-jihadists.

In my following of the revolutions, I’ve never seen any participant call themselves counter-jihadists, and I’ve certainly seen revolutions use Muslim religious terms like jihad to describe their efforts and shaheed (“martyr”, another term Islamophobes often distort) to describe those killed by the oppressive regimes.

Examples:

A search on the term counter-jihadist returned sites of Islamophobes, discussions of the Norwegian terrorist and non-Muslims’ descriptions of Muslims’ efforts to discourage hiraba. So I’m not sure where General Ellis came across the term.

The column is correct in that the revolutionaries’ use of mass non-violent techniques is a repudiation of hiraba. The revolutions are, in my opinion, the only effective way to end hiraba. It is certainly more effective than the measures of the United States’s Global War on Terror (GWOT).

One last point regarding General Smith’s editorial. He recommended some books at the end of the column, among them a book by Robin Wright. I’d recommend ignoring being cautious about everything Robin Wright and Thomas Friedman write.

*I personally think that changes in the nature of war have rendered nearly all forms of religiously-sanctioned war impossible to support.

P.S. Although the example I used was from the political left, the political right misuses Muslim religious terms as well.

Updated September 16, 2016: Egyptian man of letters in 1938 uses the word jihad on the tongues of his French friends.

US Dept of Homeland #Security @DHSJournal “If You See Something, Say Something” #GWOT #Counterterrorism #CivilRights #Discrimination #Profiling

My first instinct when I came across this video was to dismiss it and come up with alternate titles such as, “If you see someone brown, say something.” “If you hear something non-Anglo, say something.” But as I’m trying to become a more responsible person each day, and, above all else, terrorist attacks are wrong and we should do what makes sense to prevent them, I watched the video and wrote a few comments.

1. The video takes care not to portray Muslims as the only terrorists, which is good.

2. For some reason, the terrorists nearly all wear black and have hoodies.

3. At minute 2:44-2:50, surveillance and elicitation are mentioned as possible suspicious behavior. At 7:54, a man in a hoodie taking notes and pictures at the train is portrayed as suspicious. How can a person pursue a public issue without these activities? For example, Justice Clarence Thomas is supposed to come to my city of Augusta, GA to inaugurate a new federal courthouse. The date was unknown, and I was thinking of planning a demonstration. I called people in the city government to find out when the opening ceremony was to take place. Is that elicitation going to put me on some list? (I know I’m already on lists, so it does not bother me.) But will a white person with an Anglo name end up on a list because of elicitation or surveillance or note taking?

4. OK, so let’s assume all us non-white, non-Anglos take one for the team and not care about extra surveillance on us and our being investigated for normal activities. Will authorities, after investigation, inform us that we were investigated and cleared? Is there a process for removing records related to the incident from all the databases? Will these reports affect security clearances and other professional opportunities?

5. Will there be an effort by the authorities to educate our Anglo brothers and sisters who submit the crazy reports so that their paranoid fears of the non-Anglo may diminish?

Addendum:

In the time it took me to write this, CAIR reported two cases of police and private security freaking out over Muslims. One involved an airline passenger in San Diego, and the other a college student in Virginia.

Sept 8, 2011 Addendum: Under Suspicion at the Mall of America

April 29, 2012 Addendum: Charges against Virginia college student dropped

Unmanned drones speak louder than words #Cairo #Obama #Pakistan #Afghanistan #Yemen #Somalia #GWOT #Iraq #Occupation #War

Operation Flintlock in #Niger #USA #GWOT #Democracy

What I think the issue is, as I’ve said here, is that AFRICOM is taking a very narrow view of “prevention” – that the strengthening of security apparatuses is a quick, obvious, and flawed way of preventing a group like al-Qaeda from gaining a foothold. As I stated, I don’t think it can work on its own in the long run, and that the way Flintlock and related projects are being carried out is going to make a sustainable answer harder, not easier, to implement.

Operation Flintlock in #Niger #USA #GWOT #Democracy